MAAT: 42 Laws Under the Kemetic Law

Maat

Maat, also known as Ma’at or Mayet, was a female goddess in the ancient Egyptian religion who represented truth, justice, balance and morality.  The daughter of the Egyptian sun deity Ra and wife of the moon god Thoth, she served a kind of spirit of justice to the Egyptians.  She decided whether a person would successfully reach the afterlife, by weighing their soul against her feather of truth, and was the personification of the cosmic order and a representation of the stability of the universe.  The earliest writings where she is mentioned date back to the Old Kingdom of Egypt more than 2,300 years ago.

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Benefits and Uses Of Aloe Vera For Hair

 

Aloe vera extremely beneficial to the hair. It’s ingredient is a vast repository of amino acids and proteolytic enzymes which efficiently help improve scalp health and boost hair growth.  It helps to make hair growth process incredibly easier.

Benefits Of Aloe Vera For Hair

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Aloe vera is one of the most magical and beneficial ingredients you could put in your hair. Don’t believe me? You can just try and see for yourself.  But you cannot deny these interesting facts:

  • Its proteolytic enzymes which help heal and repair the damaged cells in your scalp. This improves follicle health and indirectly boosts healthy and faster hair growth.
  • Not only does the proteolytic enzyme help heal the scalp, but it also helps stimulate dormant hair follicles, promoting hair regrowth.
  • It also helps curb hair fall and controls hair shedding, ensuring that your hair remains thick and voluminous.
  • It has anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe your scalp of irritation and aggravation.
  • Its antifungal and antiviral properties help cure dandruff and flaking.
  • Aloe vera’s high content of protein, vitamins, and minerals help it nourish your follicles and hair efficiently.
  • The moisture content of aloe vera helps condition your hair, locking in nutrients and hydration.

Now that it is concrete, let’s look at the ways of using aloe vera in your hair care routine to promote hair growth.

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Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family Community and Culture

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Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration that is celebrated in the United States, as well as other countries with populations of African descendants. It is a holiday which celebrates and honors African culture in not only the African-American community but also in the World African community. This holiday is celebrated from December 26th through January 1st.

When is Kwanzaa?
This year (2017) December 26 (Tuesday)
Next year (2018) December 26 (Wednesday)
Last year (2016) December 26 (Monday)

History of Kwanzaa
Kwanzaa is a holiday tradition that is based on the “first harvest” celebrations in Africa. In recorded history, these first harvest celebrations can be traced all the way back to Nubia and Egypt and can be found in cultures all over Africa. While many of these first-fruit celebrations may differ from one society to another, they all had a few principles in common. These principles include people gathering together to celebrate, acknowledging the creator and thanking him for his blessings. a commemoration of the past, a re-commitment to African cultural thought and a time to celebrate community.

Rooted in these principles, especially those of the Ashanti and the Zulu, Kwanzaa arose from the Black Freedom Movement in 1966 in the United States. It was created by Dr. Maulana Karenga – a professor of Black Studies at California State University, Long Beach, USA. He created it after the Watts riots as a way to bring African-Americans together as a community. He gave it the name Kwanzaa -a word that is taken from the phrase “matunda ya kwanza” and is Swahili for “first-fruits.”

Kwanzaa was originally envisioned by Dr. Maulana Karenga as an oppositional alternative to Christmas. However, in later years he changed his position as to not alienate African-American Christians and later stated that Kwanzaa was not created to give people an alternative to their own religious holidays.

From 1966 through the end of the 20th century, the idea and practice of Kwanzaa began to slowly increase in popularity across the United States. Then its popularity began to increase dramatically after the start of the 21st century as the idea and practices of this holiday began to not only spread through conventional media but also through the Internet. In 2004, a study showed that a little less than 5 million African-Americans planned to celebrate the holiday that year. However, two years later, another study showed that almost 28 million African-Americans had planned on celebrating the holiday in 2006. In 2009, the popularity of Kwanzaa was further bolstered by the release of the documentary film about Kwanzaa called the “Black Candle,” a film narrated by Maya Angelou and directed by M. K. Asante. Since then, Kwanzaa has not only spread all across North American but also parts of Europe and Africa as well.

Kwanzaa Customs & Celebrations

Kwanzaa celebrations vary from family to family. Some families stick with strictly Kwanzaa related practices, while other families mix elements of Kwanzaa into their Christmas celebrations. However, most Kwanzaa celebrations are based on Nguzo Saba – or the seven principles of Kwanzaa.

The Seven Principles:

Umoja (Unity): Striving for and maintaining unity in the family and the community.
Kujichagulia (Self-Determination): Defining oneself and speaking for oneself
Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility): Building and maintaining a community and making our brother’s and sister’s problems our own and solve them together
Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): Building and maintaining our businesses for ourselves and each other
Nia (Purpose): To build and develop our collective communities together
Kuumba (Creativity): To do whatever we can to leave our communities more beautiful than when we inherited them
Imani (Faith): To believe with our hearts in our people, our families and the righteousness of our struggle
The Seven Symbols:

Kwanzaa celebrations usually include a special mat called a Mkeka in which all of the other symbols are placed. On this mate are placed a candle holder called a Kinara, seven candles which are collectively called Mishumaa Saba, mazao (fruits, nuts and vegetables), a unity cup called Kikombe cha Umoja, an ear of corn called Vibunzi and Zawadi or gifts.

Mkeka
The place mat, or Mkeka, is traditionally made from either straw or cloth. It symbolizes African history, tradition and culture. All of the other six elements are placed on the Mkeka.

Mazao
Fruits, nuts and vegetables are laid out to represent the historical foundation for this holiday – the gathering of people after a harvest. It represents bounty, joy, sharing and allows people to give thanks for their gifts.

Kinara
The Kinara, or candle holder, can be made of any material but is usually handcrafted from wood or other natural materials. This candle holder represents the ancestors and the mishumaa saba are placed in them to represent the principles of Kwanzaa – which rise from the ancestors.

The Mishumaa Saba
Mishumaa saba features seven candles. Three of them are red, three of them are green and one of them is black. The three red candles represent the principles of Ujamaa, Kuumba and Kujichagulia, and they are placed to the left of the green candles. The three green candles represent the principles of Ujima, Imani and Nia. The black candle symbolizes Umoja and is lit on December 26th.

Kikombe Cha Umoja
Kikombe cha umoja is a unity cup that is traditionally used to perform the ceremonious libation ritual, otherwise known as tambiko. This ritual is performed on the 6th day of Kwanzaa. In some African societies, the libation is poured for the living dead whose souls stay connected with the earth until it is tilled. During the Feast of Karamu, this unity cup is passed to family members and guests–all of whom drink from it to promote unity with one another. The next thing that happens is the eldest person pours a libation for the four winds (north, south, east and west). This last portion of the libation is reserved for the ancestors.

Vibunzi & Mihindi
Vibunzi is an ear of corn that is used to represent fertility. Vibunzi refers to one ear of corn. If more than one is present, then they are referred to as Mihindi. An ear is present for each child in the family. This is to show the importance of children to society and how they are the seed bearers of the culture into this future.

Zawadi
On the seventh day, gifts are exchanged with immediate family to reward accomplishments and commitments and is also exchanged with guests. It is recommended that these gifts are handmade to promote self-determination and to avoid the commercialism of the Christmas season. Accepting a gift makes the receiver an important part of the family and promotes the principle of Umoja – otherwise known as unity.

Skullcap Herb (Scutellaria lateriflora)

image_3775_1e-Chinese-Skullcap.jpgMany know Skullcap to be a cap that you put on your head, but in this case, it’s actually a medicinal plant that’s long been used for healing purposes, particularly in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Skullcap, which is named due to its shape resembling that of a medieval helmet, is of the mint family, Lamiaceae, and ranges from blue to pink in color. This medicinal plant references two herbs: American skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora) and Chinese skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis), with each treating different conditions. Other known names are: Blue Pimpernel, Blue Skullcap, Escutelaria, Grande Toque, Helmet Flower, Hoodwort, Mad-Dog Herb, Mad-Dog Skullcap, Mad-Dog Weed, Mad Weed, Quaker Bonnet, Scullcap, Scutellaria, Scutellaire, Scutellaire de Virginie, Scutellaire Latériflore, Scutelluria, Scutellaria lateriflora, Toque Bleue, Toque Casquée, Toque des Marais.

This herb has been used as an alternative medicine to help heal inflammation, provide relief from spasms, stimulate blood flow in the pelvic region, encourage menstruation, help eliminate headaches, reduce fever, treat gout and work a sedative for relaxation. Additionally, it’s been thought to treat conditions such as epilepsy, insomnia, hysteria and anxiety.

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Proteolytic Enzymes Provides Powerful Anti-Inflammatory & Immune Support

 

 

What are enzymes?

Enzymes are proteins that speed up chemical reactions. There are estimated to be between 50,000 and 70,000 different enzymes in your body that regulate every metabolic function in your body. Without enzymes, all of these metabolic functions would progress through the same steps, but would go too slowly to sustain life. In essence, enzymes make life happen where otherwise there would be none.

Most people, when they think of enzymes, think of digestive enzymes, and in the world of alternative health, that usually means digestive enzyme supplements. But as we’ve already mentioned, there are tens of thousands of different enzymes in the human body, and 99.999% have nothing to do with digestion.

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Coconut oil for perfect hair

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Lush, shiny, manageable and healthy hair can be yours, with coconut oil!

Save money and get healthier hair! Check out these uses for coconut oil and your hair!

You can even clear out commercial conditioners, shine, and styling products, and replace them with this all-natural solution. Coconut oil is rich in anti-microbial properties, lauric acid, and medium-chain fatty acids that strengthen hair, condition the scalp, and help to regrow hair.

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Neem is the Scalp Savior

If you are looking for an effective natural remedy, look for nothing other than neem leaves. Neem tree is commonly found in every household. Neem leaves has been used for ages to treat many skin ailments and hair loss. The anti-microbial and blood purifying properties of neem leaves address the root causes of the hair loss. It stimulates the growth of healthy strong hair. Neem is a versatile herb and can be used in many ways.

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Rose Oil

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The smell of a rose is one of those experiences that can ignite fond memories of young love and backyard gardens. But did you know that roses are more than a pretty smell? It’s true, for they have therapeutic benefits that can help heal many health conditions.

Rose essential oil, which is created through a simple process of steam distillation, has been used to treat health conditions and used in natural beauty treatments for thousands of years.
Research and personal experiences tell us that rose oil can improve acne, balance hormones, relieve anxiety, improve depression, reduce rosacea and naturally increase libido.

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Rose

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Roses have many landscape uses. They can be placed as
accent plants or used to form hedges or ground covers.
They offer a rainbow of colors and a variety of forms
and fragrances, and their sizes range from miniatures to
tall climbing plants. Roses may be grown under many climatic
and soil conditions and, with care, thrive and produce
flowers for many years.

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Coconut Oil

Coconut oil aids in skincare, hair care, weight loss, treating yeast infections, improving digestion and increasing immunity against a host of infections and diseases. The oil is used not just in tropical countries, where coconut plantations are abundant, but worldwide people are discovering the benefits of coconut oil.

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